Bailiffscourt Hotel & Spa

At a glance

  • Beach

    Beach

    The nearby beach is particularly great in the summer, and makes for a perfect dog walking spot

  • Child friendly

    Family Friendly

    Children are welcome at the hotel and can use the pool and facilities, sometimes at designated times.

  • Weddings

    Weddings

    With its own original Norman Chapel and private dining areas, Bailiffscourt caters to the most idyllic of weddings.

  • Location

    Location

    Though the hotel is remote, there are plenty of places to visit nearby including the village of Arundel with its antique shops and riverside walks, Chichester cathedral, and horse racing at Fontwell.

  • Architecture

    Architecture

    Despite being built as a high society home in 1927, the hotel gives the impression of an ancient summer house, while the spa’s architecture is contrastingly modern.

  • Hotel spa

    Hotel Spa Venue

    Elegantly appointed rooms only add to the palpable relaxing atmosphere in the contrastingly contemporary spa.

  • Scenery

    Scenic Location

    Bailiffscourt is set in thirty acres of private parkland with a moat, and an abundance of wildlife.

Location

Bailiffscourt Hotel & Spa

Bailiffscourt Hotel & Spa Climping West Sussex
BN17 5RW

Spa & Leisure

The timber framed barn-style architecture that houses the spa at Bailiffscourt is an elegant, understated surround for one of the most luxurious spas in Sussex. Set against contrasting green oak, polished limestone interiors and long glass windows that bring the outside in, facilities include indoor and outdoor pools, state-of-the-art gym, tennis courts and relaxation areas.

Inspired by a Mediterranean lifestyle, the spa uses organic Temple Spa products in a range of treatments that include the aptly named power breakfast espresso facial which really does use oats and yoghurt, full body treatments, massages, facials, manicures and pedicures.

Please note: the indoor pool will be shut from 12th - 15th December 2016

Hotel & Accommodation

The thirty-nine bedrooms are spread across the Medieval House that is the main body of the hotel and a series of other buildings including the Moat House and The Oaks which overlook the old moat and the fields beyond. The hotel is dog friendly, so bring your pooches.

The gothic mullioned windows and tapestry-like interiors leave you with the impression of a long and regal history – though it was actually built in 1927. The dining room under the direction of Head Chef Russell Williams serves modern English cuisine while the rose-clad courtyard provides an enchanting setting for afternoon tea in the summertime. Of course the hotel’s location close to the sea is an undeniable draw-card, and provides the perfect backdrop for such a relaxing setting.